ABOUT

we are lcg general & electrical contractors

LCG was incorporated in 2006 as a construction consulting firm that is now a General and Electrical contracting company made up of Adam Winslow, Scott High and Wesley Smith.

 

Adam Scott and Wes value community and people. This value informs every business decision, manifesting itself in each project and the quality contained within. 

Specializing in General & Electrical contracing, LCG prides itself in building long term relationships built on quality work. Please contact us for a quote on your next project.

 

 

LCG was incorporated in 2006 as a construction consulting firm that is now a General and Electrical contracting company made up of Adam Winslow, Scott High and Wesley Smith

FAQ

 

What is a state certified General Contractor (GC)?

A state certified General Contractor is a certified contractor licensed by the state of Florida whose services are unlimited as to type of work which he or she may do throughout the state of Florida. All county and local jurisdictions are included in “unlimited.”   

What is a state certified Electrical Contractor (EC)?

A state certified Electrical Contractor is a “certified” electrical contractor licensed by the state of Florida whose services can be provided in all county and local jurisdictions and includes all scopes of work necessary to install, repair, alter, add to, or design electrical wiring, fixtures, appliances, apparatus, raceways, and conduit, including the electrical installations and systems within plants and substations and ALL alarm systems and specialty electrical categories.

What is a Notice of Commencement (NOC)?

A Notice of Commencement or NOC is a form signed and notarized by the Owner and filed with the county the project resides in and serves two main functions. The first function is to serve as a project information source for those who need to know information such as property description, property owner and whether or not the property has a payment bond. The NOC will contain essential information about the project that a Lienor needs to know in order to comply with the procedure of perfecting lien rights OR private payment bond rights. The second function is that the NOC fixes the time when Liens recorded under the direct contract for which the NOC was recorded attached to the title of the property. The form of the NOC is found in Florida Statute 713.13

What is the purpose of Notice to Owner?

A Notice to Owner (NTO) is a written notice prescribed by Florida Statute (713.06) that officially advises the owner of an improvement that the sender, usually a subcontractor or supplier not dealing directly with the owner, is looking to the owner to be sure the sender is paid before payment is made to the contractor on the job.

Florida Statute (713.06), requires that a Notice to Owner be served on the improvement owner not later than 45 days from the date offirst labor, services, or materials delivered to the job site as a prerequisite to secure the sender’s right to lien the property in the event the sender is not properly paid for work done at the property.

This notice gives the owner the opportunity to verify that the sender is paid, usually by obtaining a “release of lien” by the sender of the notice when payments are made to the contractor, so that the owner monitors downstream payments and is not later surprised with a lien against the property from someone with whom the owner does not have a contract. 

Actual/verbal notice to the owner by the non-privity party working on the job is NO substitute for the written notice to owner. A Notice to Owner will improve cash flow by helping to be sure you get paid, establish good communication between your business and those making/securing the payments, and protect lienor’s right to payment by securing the right to lien a property (Via a filed NOC) should the need arise.

Who Serves the Notice to Owner?

Any potential lienor who is not dealing directly with the property owner, such as a subcontractor or supplier, must serve a notice to owner with three exceptions. A laborer, a professional lienor, and a person who is working only on subdivision improvements need not serve a Notice to Owner to secure the right to lien. All other potential lienors who are not dealing directly with the owner must timely serve a Notice to Owner as a preliminary step to obtaining lien rights. This notice must be timely served, as a precautionary measure, even where no problem has yet developed, if one wants to be able to later claim lien rights. If this preliminary step is not taken, the right to later claim a construction lien against the property will be gone.

What is a Release of Lien?

 In general, a Release of Lien is a release of the lienor’s right to lien the property in accordance with the terms of the release. A release may be for a specific dollar amount, for all lien rights through a specific period, or for both. A supply house supplying materials on behalf of the plumber will issue the Notice to Owner informing the Owner that O

Is there a standard release form?

Yes, Florida Statute 713.20 provides “standard” release forms. A Release of Lien should be given by the Lienor to the Owner for payment on the particular items the lien reflects. A Partial Release of Lien may be issued for a portion or Final Release of Lien.

On bigger contracts, how are payments structured during project duration?

Once the contract is signed between Owner and Contractor, a schedule of values is given to Owner for review and approval which specifies commencement and completion items with respective monetary association of each line item adding up to total of the contract price. This schedule of values the contractor to request payment for each line item at the appropriate time and regulates cash-flow on the project.

What are long lead items?

Long lead items are those items that are not readily available through normal purchasing systems and will require special attention to ensure delivery at the required time. The procurement of long lead items is critical to ensure project schedules is uninterrupted. Examples of long lead items are windows / doors, specialty electrical equipment, roof truss packages, etc.

 

INFORMATION SOURCES

www.buildersnotice.net

Florida Contractors Manuel 2013 Edition